Archives: FBA Authors

Oliver Milman

Oliver Milman

Oliver Milman is a British journalist and the environment correspondent at the Guardian. He lives in New York City.

His first book, The Insect Crisis, is a devastating account of how a silent collapse in worldwide insect populations is threatening everything from the birds in our skies to the food on our plates. It was published by Atlantic in 2022 and shortlisted for the Wainwright Prize for Conservation Writing.

Grace is represented by Sally in the UK on behalf of Zoë Pagnamenta at The Zoë Pagnamenta Agency

Books by Oliver Milman

Larisa Brown

Larisa Brown

Larisa Brown has worked as a journalist for more than a decade, covering the Middle East region and wider issues on defence, security, diplomacy and politics. She is currently Defence Editor at The Times and also covers security and diplomacy for the Sunday Times. Her work has taken her to multiple conflict zones, including Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq, Ukraine and Libya and she was posted to Beirut, Lebanon for a short period in 2018. Larisa is a British Journalism Awards Campaign of the Year winner for her work highlighting the plight of Afghan interpreters.

She is currently working on her first book, The Gardener of Lashkar Gah, due to be published in September 2023.

Lucy Wooding

Lucy Wooding

Lucy Wooding is the Langford Fellow and Tutor in History at Lincoln College, Oxford. She taught at Queen’s University Belfast and King’s College London before coming to Oxford. Her research specialisms lie in the field of early modern British history, and she is particularly interested in the many different manifestations of religious culture in early modern England, from popular devotional traditions to the role of religion in political culture.

She is the author of Henry VIII (Routledge, 2009) and most recently Tudor England: A History (Yale, 2022). She is currently researching the relationship between liturgy and royal ritual in the Tudor period.’

Books by Lucy Wooding

Alan Murrin

Alan Murrin

Alan Murrin is an Irish writer based in Berlin. His novel in progress was shortlisted for the Peters Fraser Dunlop Queer Fiction Prize and was long-listed for the Caledonia New Novel Award 2022. In 2021 he was the winner of the Bournemouth Writing Prize for his short story “The Wake”, which went on to be shortlisted for short story of the year at the Irish Book Awards.

Alan is the recipient of an Irish Arts Council Agility Award and an Arts Council Literature Bursary. He is a graduate of the prose fiction masters at the University of East Anglia. His work was featured as part of the New Irish Writing series in the Irish Independent. He writes for The Irish Times, The Times Literary Supplement and The Spectator. His writing on art and photography has appeared in Art Review and The White Review.

Alan’s debut novel, The Coast Road, sold to Bloomsbury at auction, with further deals struck in the US (HarperVia at auction), Germany (pre-empted by DTV), and Italy (pre-empted by Mondadori).

Set in County Donegal in 1994, the year before divorce became legal in Ireland, The Coast Road tells the story of two women – Izzy Keaveney, a housewife, and Colette Crowley, a poet. Colette has left her husband and sons to pursue a relationship with a married man in Dublin. When she returns to the community to try and reclaim her old life, her husband Shaun, a successful businessman, denies her access to her children. The only way she can see them is with Izzy acting as a go-between. The friendship that develops between the two will ultimately lead to tragedy for one woman, and freedom for the other. This is a story about the limits that were placed on women’s lives in Ireland not so long ago, and the consequences they suffered for trying to seek independence. The writing is economical and evokes deep compassion for its heroines.

 

 

Photo courtesy of Adam Fearon

Kathryn Hurlock

Kathryn Hurlock

Kathryn Hurlock is Head of the History Research Centre, and Reader in Medieval History at Manchester Metropolitan University, and Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. She is a religious historian working on the ways in which people have engaged in major religious activities like pilgrimage and crusading from the middle ages to the present day.

She is the author of Wales and the Crusades, c.1095-1291 (University of Wales Press, 2011), Britain, Ireland, and the Crusades, 1000-1300 (Palgrave, 2013), and Medieval Welsh Pilgrimage, c.1100-1500 (Palgrave, 2018), as well as several edited collections, book chapters, and journal articles. Kathryn has contributed to television and radio as an expert commentator on pilgrimage, crusading, and medieval history.

Her first trade book, Heavenly Places: How Pilgrimage Changed the World, will be published in 2025 by Profile Books.

Photo courtesy of Andrew Abram

Kieran Yates

Kieran Yates

Kieran Yates is a London-based journalist, broadcaster and editor who has been writing about culture, technology and politics for over 10 years. She’s written everywhere from the Guardian, FADER, VICE, The Independent and beyond, had an acclaimed monthly column at VICE titled ‘British Values’, was nominated for Culture Writer of the Year in 2016 and regularly hosts events and panels discussing issues across music, politics, and news.

Kieran contributed to the award-winning book of essays, The Good Immigrant in 2017 about immigrant stories in the UK, where she wrote about ‘Going Home’. In 2015 she started a fanzine called ‘British Values’, a political satire and culture magazine that celebrates immigrant communities in the UK. She is the co-author of Generation Vexed: What the English Riots Didn’t Tell Us About Your Nation’s Youth published by Random House in 2011, and was part of the Guardian’s ‘My Favourite Album’ eBook in 2011.

Kieran is currently working on her debut book about home and the housing crisis titled All The Houses I’ve Lived In, to be published by Simon and Schuster, out Spring 2023.

Books by Kieran Yates

Clive Webb

Clive Webb

Clive Webb is Professor of Modern American History at the University of Sussex. He is the recipient of a Leverhulme Fellowship, studying acts of violence against foreign nationals in the United States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His research has been featured in articles written for the Guardian, Independent and The New York Times. His first trade book, Vietdamned: The True Story of How the World’s Great Thinkers Put the US Government on Trial for War Crimes, will be published by Profile Books in 2024.

Clare Hammond

Clare Hammond

Clare Hammond is a British investigative journalist. Based in London, she works for non-profit Global Witness, where her recent work has exposed failings by Big Tech and issues relating to natural resources, conflict and corruption. In Myanmar, where she lived for six years until 2020, she was most recently the digital editor of Frontier, the country’s best-known investigative magazine. A Google News Initiative and Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting grantee, her reporting has won multiple awards. On the Shadow Tracks: A Journey Through Occupied Myanmar, will be published by Allen Lane in 2024.

Liam Shaw

Liam Shaw

Liam Shaw is a biologist researching the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance. He is currently a Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Oxford and a Visiting Researcher at the University of Durham. His main research uses DNA sequencing data to understand the ‘horizontal’ transfer of resistance genes between different species of bacteria.

His writing on science has appeared in the London Review of Books and the Morning Star. 

His first book, Fossil Drugs: A Natural History of Antibiotics, will be published in the UK by Bodley Head.

 

 

Owen Rees

Owen Rees

Dr Owen Rees is Associate Lecturer in Ancient History at Manchester Metropolitan University, where he specialises in the transition of soldiers from civilian life to the battlefield and back again. His books on the topic of ancient Greek warfare include Great Battles of the Classical Greek World (Pen & Sword, 2016); Great Naval Battles of the Ancient Greek World (Pen & Sword, 2018); and Military Departures, Homecomings, and Death in Classical Athens: Hoplite Transitions (Bloomsbury Academic, 2022).

Owen has recently been awarded a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship to conduct research on “Experiences, Definitions, and Identities of the Veteran in Classical Greece”, a fellowship he will hold at the University of Nottingham from 2023.

He is also the founder and lead editor of the website BadAncient.com, which brings together a growing network of specialists to fact-check common claims made about the ancient world and expose the prevalent pseudohistory in the modern day.

Owen’s first trade book, The Far Edges of the Known World: A New Perspective On Our Ancient Civilizations, will be published in the UK by Bloomsbury in 2024 and by Norton in the US. In this major work, Rees steers us to a fresh look at the ancient world, turning our attention to the peripheries to tell the stories of everyday ancient people and showing how extensive archaeological excavations have shed new light on cultures that are often overlooked.